>>  Welcome.A-Z of Drugs.Alcohol.Quiz.Emergency Help.Services.Links.News.Contact

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
 
 
*  
*
* *

A-Z of Drugs

*
         
*    
A-Z of drugs

 of Drugs

*

LSD

Also known as:

Acid, blotter, 'cid, dots, cheer, drop, flash, microdots, tabs, trips, Lucy, lightening flash, hawk, liquid acid, paper mushrooms, smilies, tab, trips, rainbows and many other names relating to the pictures on the squares.

LSD and the law

LSD is classified as a Class A drug under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.

What is LSD?

Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD) is a powerful hallucinogenic derived from fungus growing wild on rye and other grasses.   LSD 'tabs' often have logos or pictures and it is from these that there are so many different names.    It is the most powerful mind-altering drug known to man as it only takes a few millionths of a gram to affect a human being.

What does it look like?

LSD is a white powder often dissolved into a liquid and soaked onto tiny squares of blotting paper to be sold on the street.   It can also be found in a liquid form, dropped into sugar cubes or made into tablets or capsules.

How is it used?

LSD is usually swallowed.

What are the effects?

The effects of LSD or the 'trip' are individual to the user and take into account the situation that they are in. No trip is ever the same. Usually a low dose (half a tab) will result in a mild experience and a full tab will result in a full blown trip.   It changes the way the mind sees things and users often report that colours become brighter, objects become distorted, sounds become richer and they experience different emotional levels such as a spiritual experience or being separate from the body.   The user loses any sense of time and may become happy and energised or withdrawn and terrified depending on the type of trip they experience.   The pupils dilate; people may become confused and can experience hot and cold flushes as well as a suppressed appetite, increased heart rate and sleeping problems.

When do the effects start and how long do they last?

Trips usually begin half an hour after taking it.   They peak up to six hours later and then eventually fade after about twelve hours. However, once LSD has been taken the effects can exceed 24 hours meaning a bad trip can be very disturbing for the user.

What are the risks?

As there is no way of stopping the drug once it has been taken users can become very frightened, paranoid, threatened and experience a feeling of being out of control.   'Flashbacks' can occur days, weeks and even months after experiencing a bad trip.   LSD can complicate problems such as depression and anxiety and in extreme cases can result in psychological problems.  

Strengths of LSD vary and it is difficult to know just how strong a dose has been taken.   With a very high dose it becomes difficult for users to think or act normally and concentration is greatly reduced meaning that accidents are more likely to occur under the influence of LSD.

Is it addictive?

LSD is not considered an addictive drug since it does not produce compulsive drug-seeking behaviour. However, like many addictive drugs, LSD produces tolerance, so users who take the drug repeatedly must take higher doses each time to achieve the previous effect.

Back to drugs page

 

 
 

Stoke-on-Trent Drug and Alcohol Action Team, First Floor, Civic Centre, Glebe St, Stoke on Trent, ST4 1WR
Tel: 01782 235708 . Fax: 01782 235003 . E-mail: drugactionteam@stoke.gov.uk